Preparing for Emergencies

It can be difficult to remember important information about your child's health in an emergency. 

Because of this, doctors suggest that parents keep a record of their kids' important health information at hand. This can help medical personnel make important decisions more quickly.

This is one reason you should make sure to sign up for our Delaware Pediatrics Patient Portal. Having access to your child’s medical record in an emergency situation can be vital. 

To sign up for the portal, if you have not already done so, please go to our Patient Portal tab. 

If your kids spend time in childcare or with a babysitter, you'll want to provide them with additional written information. Besides how to reach you quickly, leave the name and phone number of other emergency contacts. Also, provide them with contact information for Delaware Pediatrics, your dentist, and local emergency and poison control numbers in case you can't be reached.

If you'll be away from your kids for a longer time, such as for a vacation or business trip,  you'll want to leave a release allowing their caregiver to authorize medical care in your absence. 

Anaphylaxis

During a reaction, an oral antihistamine may also be given, but not as a substitute for epinephrine. Also helpful in case of an emergency is medical identification jewelry that includes information about your child's allergy. This should be worn at all times. Your doctor should also give you a written action plan outlining the steps to take in the event of an emergency. It is important to share this action plan with anyone who cares for your child.

Anaphylaxis is a serious allergic reaction. It comes on quickly and can be fatal. It often affects many body systems. This type of reaction is a medical emergency and immediate medical attention is important. Children with asthma and allergies to certain foods, stinging insects, or medicines are at highest risk, though anaphylaxis may occur in anyone. Your pediatrician may refer you to an allergist. An allergist has specialized training in diagnosing the cause of anaphylaxis and providing additional treatment. Parents should know the symptoms of anaphylaxis and what to do in case it happens to their child.

What are the symptoms of anaphylaxis?

Anaphylaxis includes a wide range of symptoms that often happen quickly. The most severe symptoms restrict breathing and blood circulation. Combinations of symptoms may occur. The most common symptoms may affect the following:

  • SKIN: itching, hives, redness, swelling

  • NOSE: sneezing, stuffy nose, runny nose

  • MOUTH: itching, swelling of lips or tongue

  • THROAT: itching, tightness, difficulty swallowing, hoarseness

  • CHEST: shortness of breath, cough, wheeze, chest pain, tightness

  • HEART: weak pulse, passing out, shock

  • GUT: vomiting, diarrhea, cramps

  • NEUROLOGIC: dizziness, fainting, feeling that you are about to die

What causes anaphylaxis?

Anaphylaxis occurs when the immune system overreacts to normally harmless substances called allergens. The following are the most common allergens that can trigger anaphylaxis:

  • Food such as

    • Peanuts

    • Nuts from trees (such as walnuts, pistachios, pecans, cashews)

    • Shellfish (such as shrimp, lobster)

    • Fish (such as tuna, salmon, cod)

    • Milk

    • Eggs

  • In rare cases, anaphylaxis may be related to a certain food followed by exercise.

  • Insect stings such as from

    • Bees

    • Wasps

    • Hornets

    • Yellow jackets

    • Fire ants

  • Medicines. Antibiotics and antiseizure medicines are some of the more common medicines that cause anaphylaxis. However, any medicine, even aspirin and other non­steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, have the potential to cause severe reactions.

What should I do if my child has an anaphylactic reaction?

For anyone experiencing anaphylaxis, epinephrine should be given right away followed by a call to 911 for further treatment and transfer to a hospital. The main medicine to treat anaphylaxis is epinephrine. This is a medicine given by an injection. The best place to inject it is in the muscles of the outer part of the thigh. If the symptoms do not improve very quickly, the injection should be given again in 5 to 30 minutes.

Children who are old enough can be taught how to give themselves epinephrine if needed. The medicine comes in auto-injector syringes (EpiPen or Twinject) to make this easier. Epinephrine should be prescribed for anyone who has ever had an anaphylactic attack and for children at high risk for anaphylaxis. They are available in 2 different doses based on the weight of the child. You should always have at least 2 doses with you at all times. School-aged children also need one at school with instructions from their doctor about how and when to use it.

During a reaction, an oral antihistamine may also be given, but not as a substitute for epinephrine. Also helpful in case of an emergency is medical identification jewelry that includes information about your child's allergy. This should be worn at all times. Your doctor should also give you a written action plan outlining the steps to take in the event of an emergency. It is important to share this action plan with anyone who cares for your child.

How can I prevent another anaphylactic attack?

After an anaphylactic attack, your child needs to be seen by a doctor. Even if the cause seems obvious, it may be more complicated than you think. An evaluation by an allergist is often needed to identify the cause(s). A customized care plan for prevention and treatment can be created once the causes are known.

In most cases, the only way to prevent it from happening again is to avoid the cause. However, your child's care plan can help provide safe alternatives without unnecessary restriction of safe foods, medicines, or activities. An emergency action plan describing the allergies, symptoms, and treatments can help prepare you if your child has another attack.

Can anaphylaxis be outgrown or cured?

Although children's allergies are often outgrown, anaphylaxis frequently lasts for many years or even for life. Periodic reevaluation may be needed to see if your child is still allergic and to review how to avoid triggers and treat reactions. In the case of anaphylaxis caused by stinging insects, immunotherapy (also called allergy injections or shots) can help prevent anaphylaxis from future stings, but is currently not available for other types of anaphylactic allergies.

To find out more

  • American Academy of Pediatrics— Section on Allergy and Immunology: www.aap.org/sections/allergy

  • American Academy of Allergy Asthma & Immunology: www.aaaai.org/patients/gallery

  • American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology: www.acaai.org/public

  • Food Allergy & Anaphylaxis Network (FAAN): www.foodallergy.org

Please note: Listing of resources does not imply an endorsement by the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP). The AAP is not responsible for the content of the resources mentioned in this publication. Phone numbers and Web site addresses are as current as possible, but may change at any time.

Products are mentioned for informational purposes only. Inclusion in this publication does not imply endorsement by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

Last Reviewed:1/24/2019 2:20:45 AM
Last Revised:1/1/2019 2:20:53 AM
Copyright © 2007 American Academy of Pediatrics

Choking Prevention and First Aid for Infants and Children

Keep the following household items away from infants and children:
Last Reviewed:1/24/2019 2:20:50 AM
Last Revised:1/1/2019 2:20:58 AM

CPR

In the past, we used the "ABC's of CPR " because it reminded us that there was a very specific order in which a person should be resuscitated. However, the American Heart Association updated its recommendations for CPR in October, 2010 and now recommends that an untrained rescuer begin chest compressions immediately. The ABC acronym has been changed to CAB.


Compressions
Airway
Breathing

Untrained rescuers should focus on continuous compressions and not perform mouth-to-mouth resuscitation if they are not familiar with it.

CPR FOR INFANTS (under 1 year)

EVALUATE your child's condition. Shout or gently shake your child to see if he will awaken. Put your ear next to his nose and listen for breathing. Look at the chest to see if it rises with each breath.

CALL FOR HELP. Have someone dial 911. If no one is available, do CPR for 2 minutes before calling 911.

IF YOUR CHILD IS NOT BREATHING OR WILL NOT AWAKEN:

POSITION your child. Put him on his back on a firm surface. If you think he could have injured his neck, support his head in order to keep the neck from twisting as you roll him over.

TILT THE HEAD BACK so that his nose is "in the air". Check the mouth to make sure your child has not choked on anything.

diagram of woman doing CPR on an infant under 1

BEGIN CHEST COMPRESSIONS. With an infant, place two fingers on the breastbone, with your index finger at the height of the nipples. Compress at a depth of 1 1/2 inches (about 1/3 of the chest height) at a rate of two compressions per second. Do 30 compressions.

GIVE 2 RESCUE BREATHS. For an infant, place your mouth over his mouth and nose and breathe GENTLY, watching to see if the chest rises and falls. If not, readjust the head (see POSITION above), then give 2 breaths and return to chest compressions. NOTE: If the chest will not rise (or you do not know how to do rescue breaths), skip that step and just do chest compressions. You can try it again after 30 more compressions*.

*Continue chest compressions and breathing until paramedics arrive.

CPR FOR CHILDREN (1 to 8 years)

EVALUATE your child's condition. Shout or gently shake your child's shoulders to see if he will awaken. Put your ear next to his nose and listen for breathing. Look at the chest to see if it rises with each breath.

CALL FOR HELP. Have someone dial 911. If no one is available, do CPR for 2 minutes before calling 911.

IF YOUR CHILD IS NOT BREATHING OR WILL NOT AWAKEN:

POSITION your child. Put him on his back on a firm surface. If you think he could have injured his neck, support his head in order to keep the neck from twisting as you roll him over.

TILT THE HEAD BACK so that his nose is "in the air". Check the mouth to make sure your child has not choked on anything.

BEGIN CHEST COMPRESSIONS. For a child, put one hand on the chest between his nipples. Lock your elbows and press straight down about 2 inches. Continue for 30 compressions at a rate of two compressions per second.

GIVE 2 RESCUE BREATHS. For a child, place your mouth over his mouth and press his nose shut with your fingers. Breathe GENTLY, watching to see if the chest rises and falls. If not, readjust the head (see POSITION above), then give 2 breaths and return to chest compressions. NOTE: If the chest will not rise (or you do not know how to do rescue breaths), skip that step and just do chest compressions. You can try it again after 30 more compressions*.

*Continue chest compressions and breathing until paramedics arrive.

CPR FOR OLDER CHILDREN & ADULTS

EVALUATE THE VICTIM Shout or gently shake her shoulders to see if she will awaken. Put your ear next to her nose and listen for breathing. Look at the chest to see if it rises with each breath.

CALL FOR HELP. Have someone dial 911. If no one is available, do CPR for 2 minutes before calling 911.

IF THE VICTIM IS NOT BREATHING OR WILL NOT AWAKEN:

POSITION the victim. Put her on her back on a firm surface. If you think she could have injured her neck, support her head in order to keep the neck from twisting as you roll her over.

TILT THE HEAD BACK so that her nose is "in the air". Use a "Chin Lift" by pulling up on the back of the jaw to open the airway. If you did not witness the event, check the mouth to see if there is any food/foreign body.

BEGIN CHEST COMPRESSIONS. Put the heel of your hand in the middle of her chest, placing the other hand over the first hand. Lock your elbows and press straight down about 2 inches. Allow the chest to return to its normal position. Continue for 30 compressions at a rate of 100 times a minute. (Some people recommend that you press to the beat of "Stayin' Alive").

If you have NOT been trained in CPR, you may continue to just give chest compressions until help arrives or the victim wakes up. Otherwise, proceed to give rescue breaths.

If you are in a public building that has an automated external defibrillator (AED), turn it on. If you saw the victim collapse, attach the AED immediately and follow the instructions. Otherwise, perfom CPR for 1 minute before using the AED.

GIVE 2 RESCUE BREATHS. Place your mouth over her mouth (or use a CPR mask if available) and press her nose shut with your fingers. Breathe GENTLY, watching to see if the chest rises and falls. If not, readjust the head (see POSITION above), then give 2 breaths and return to chest compressions. NOTE: If the chest will not rise (or you do not know how to do rescue breaths), skip that step and just do chest compressions. You can try it again after 30 more compressions*.

*Continue chest compressions and breathing until paramedics arrive.

Croup: When Your Child Needs Hospital Care

At the hospital, your child's doctor will decide the best way to treat your child. Treatments may include the following:

Croup is a common illness that affects the airways, making it hard for a child to breathe. It's most common in toddlers but can affect children between 6 months and 12 years of age. Another symptom is a loud barking cough that is worse at night. Trouble breathing and the barking cough can be scary for parent and child. Most children with viral croup also have low fever.

Symptoms to watch for

Most cases of croup can be treated successfully at home. However, children with severe cases of croup may need to be treated in the hospital. Call 911 or an ambulance right away if your child

  • Makes a whistling sound (called stridor) that gets louder with each breath.

  • Cannot speak because of a lack of breath.

  • Seems to struggle to get a breath.

  • Has a bluish color of the lips, mouth, or fingernails.

  • Drools or has trouble swallowing.

Care of your child at the hospital

At the hospital, your child's doctor will decide the best way to treat your child. Treatments may include the following:

  • Epinephrine. This medicine can help reduce swelling in the upper airways so that your child can breathe better. Epinephrine is given through a nebulizer. A nebulizer is a machine that turns liquid medicine into a fine mist. The mist is breathed in through a mouthpiece or face mask. Often, when this medicine is used, doctors prefer to continue to watch a child for several hours after it is given. This sometimes requires a stay in the hospital.

  • Corticosteroids. These medicines can be useful in reducing inflammation in the body. They work in 2 ways. Systemic corticosteroids must go through the body to treat the inflammation in the upper airway. Inhaled or intranasal corticosteroids go directly to where the inflammation is. (Corticosteroids are not the same as anabolic steroids that are used illegally by some athletes to build muscle.)

  • Oxygen. Sometimes when breathing is very difficult for a child, the body may not get enough oxygen and the work of breathing increases. Oxygen given through a mask or a small tube near the nose will make it easier to breathe.

When can my child go home?

As soon as your child's breathing improves, usually within a few hours, he will be allowed to go home. Sometimes a child with croup will stay in the hospital overnight for observation.

Care of your child at home

If your child has a mild case of croup, breathing in moist air may help.

  • Bring your child into a bathroom where a hot shower is running. Let your child breathe in the moist air to help open her airway. However, do not leave a young child alone with the shower running.

  • Use a cool-mist humidifier in your child's room.

  • Take your child outdoors for a few minutes. Inhaling moist, cool night air may help open the air passages so that she can breathe more freely. Remember to dress your child for the cold weather.

If breathing in moist air doesn't help and you notice any of the "Symptoms to watch for" listed previously, your child needs to be taken to the hospital right away. Call 911 or an ambulance for help.

Keep your child healthy

The following are ways to keep your child healthy:

  • Stop germs from spreading. Most cases of croup are caused by cold and flu viruses. Frequent hand washing with soap is the best way to prevent germs from spreading. You can also use a waterless hand cleaner.

  • Avoid germs. Try to keep your child away from other children with croup or other upper respiratory infections (such as colds and flu).

  • Avoid smokers. Do not let anyone smoke around your child, as it can make croup worse.

Last Reviewed:1/24/2019 2:20:51 AM
Last Revised:1/1/2019 2:20:59 AM
Copyright © 2008

First Aid

Fever in children is usually caused by infection. It also can be caused by chemicals, poisons, medicines, an environment that is too hot, or an extreme level of overactivity.

TIPP SHEETS: This two-page guide describes basic first aid steps for the following medical situations: eye injuries, fractures and sprains, fever, head injuries, bites and stings, poisoning, seizures, fainting, broken teeth, burns and scalds, nosebleeds, skin wounds, and choking. It also includes detailed instructions for administering CPR to infants and older children.

Call 911 or your local emergency number for a severely ill or injured child.

Call 1-800-222-1222 (Poison Help) if you have a poison emergency.

General

  • Know how to get help.

  • Make sure the area is safe for you and the child.

  • When possible, personal protective equipment (such as gloves) should be used.

  • Position the child appropriately if her airway needs to be opened or CPR (cardiopulmonary resuscitation) is needed. (Please see other side.)

  • DO NOT MOVE A CHILD WHO MAY HAVE A NECK OR BACK INJURY (from a fall, motor vehicle crash, or other injury, or if the child says his neck or back hurts) unless he is in danger.

  • Look for anything (such as emergency medical identification jewelry or paperwork) that may give you information about health problems.

Stings, Bites, and Allergies

Stinging Insects Remove the stinger as soon as possible with a scraping motion using a firm item (such as the edge of a credit card). Put a cold compress on the bite to relieve the pain. If trouble breathing; fainting; swelling of lips, face, or throat; or hives over the entire body occurs, call 911 or your local emergency number right away. For hives in a small area, nausea, or vomiting, call the pediatrician. For spider bites, call the pediatrician or Poison Help (1-800-222-1222). Have the pediatrician check any bites that become red, warm, swollen, or painful.

Animal or Human Bites Wash the wound well with soap and water. Call the pediatrician. The child may need a tetanus or rabies shot or antibiotics.

Ticks Use tweezers or your fingers to grasp as close as possible to the head of the tick and briskly pull the tick away from where it is attached. Call the pediatrician if the child develops symptoms such as a rash or fever.

Snake Bites Take the child to an emergency department if you are unsure of the type of snake or if you are concerned that the snake may be poisonous. Keep the child at rest. Do not apply ice. Loosely splint the injured area and keep it at rest, positioned at or slightly below the level of the heart. Identify the snake, if you can do so safely. If you are not able to identify the snake but are able to kill it safely, take it with you to the emergency department for identification.

Allergy Swelling, problems breathing, and paleness may be signs of severe allergy. Call 911 or your local emergency number right away. Some people may have emergency medicine for these times. If possible, ask about emergency medicine they may have and help them administer it if necessary.

Fever

Fever in children is usually caused by infection. It also can be caused by chemicals, poisons, medicines, an environment that is too hot, or an extreme level of overactivity.

Take the child's temperature to see if he has a fever. Most pediatricians consider any thermometer reading 100.4°F (38°C) or higher as a fever. However, the way the child looks and acts is more important than how high the child's temperature is.

Call the pediatrician right away if the child has a fever and

  • Appears very ill, is unusually drowsy, or is very fussy

  • Has other symptoms such as a stiff neck, a severe headache, severe sore throat, severe ear pain, an unexplained rash, repeated vomiting or diarrhea, or difficulty breathing

  • Has a condition causing immune suppression (such as sickle cell disease, cancer, or chronic steroid use)

  • Has had a first seizure but is no longer seizing

  • Is younger than 3 months (12 weeks) and has a temperature of 100.4°F (38°C) or higher

  • Has been in a very hot place, such as an overheated car

To make the child more comfortable, dress him in light clothing, give him cool liquids to drink, and keep him calm. The pediatrician may recommend fever medicines. Do NOT use aspirin to treat a child's fever. Aspirin has been linked with Reye syndrome, a serious disease that affects the liver and brain.

Skin Wounds

Make sure the child is up to date for tetanus vaccination. Any open wound may need a tetanus booster even when the child is currently immunized. If the child has an open wound, ask the pediatrician if the child needs a tetanus booster.

Bruises Apply cool compresses. Call the pediatrician if the child has a crush injury, large bruises, continued pain, or swelling. The pediatrician may recommend acetaminophen for pain.

Cuts Rinse small cuts with water until clean. Use direct pressure with a clean cloth to stop bleeding and hold in place for 1 to 2 minutes. If the cut is not deep, apply an antibiotic ointment, then cover the cut with a clean bandage. Call the pediatrician or seek emergency care for large or deep cuts, or if the wound is wide open. For major bleeding, call for help (911 or your local emergency number). Continue direct pressure with a clean cloth until help arrives.

Scrapes Rinse with clean, running tap water for at least 5 minutes to remove dirt and germs. Do not use detergents, alcohol, or peroxide. Apply an antibiotic ointment and a bandage that will not stick to the wound.

Splinters Remove small splinters with tweezers, then wash until clean. If you cannot remove the splinter completely, call the pediatrician.

Puncture Wounds Do not remove large objects (such as a knife or stick) from a wound. Call for help (911 or your local emergency number). Such objects must be removed by a doctor. Call the pediatrician for all puncture wounds. The child may need a tetanus booster.

Bleeding Apply pressure with gauze over the bleeding area for 1 to 2 minutes. If still bleeding, add more gauze and apply pressure for another 5 minutes. You can also wrap an elastic bandage firmly over gauze and apply pressure. If bleeding continues, call for help (911 or your local emergency number).

Eye Injuries

If anything is splashed in the eye, flush gently with water for at least 15 minutes. Call Poison Help (1-800-222-1222) or the pediatrician for further advice. Any injured or painful eye should be seen by a doctor. Do NOT touch or rub an injured eye. Do NOT apply medicine. Do NOT remove objects stuck in the eye. Cover the painful or injured eye with a paper cup or eye shield until you can get medical help.

Fractures and Sprains

If an injured area is painful, swollen, or deformed, or if motion causes pain, wrap it in a towel or soft cloth and make a splint with cardboard or other firm material to hold the arm or leg in place. Do not try to straighten. Apply ice or a cool compress wrapped in thin cloth for not more than 20 minutes. Call the pediatrician or seek emergency care. If there is a break in the skin near the fracture or if you can see the bone, cover the area with a clean bandage, make a splint as described above, and seek emergency care.

If the foot or hand below the injured part is cold or discolored (blue or pale), seek emergency care right away.

Burns and Scalds

General Treatment First, stop the burning process by removing the child from contact with hot water or a hot object (for example, hot iron). If clothing is burning, smother flames. Remove clothing unless it is firmly stuck to the skin. Run cool water over burned skin until the pain stops. Do not apply ice, butter, grease, medicine, or ointment.

Burns With Blisters Do not break the blisters. Ask the pediatrician how to cover the burn. For burns on the face, hands, feet, or genitals, seek emergency care.

Large or Deep Burns Call 911 or your local emergency number. After stopping and cooling the burn, keep the child warm with a clean sheet covered with a blanket until help arrives.

Electrical Burns Disconnect electrical power. If the child is still in contact with an electrical source, do NOT touch the child with bare hands. Pull the child away from the power source with an object that does not conduct electricity (such as a wooden broom handle), only after the power is turned off. ALL electrical burns need to be seen by a doctor.

Nosebleeds

Keep the child in a sitting position with the head tilted slightly forward. Apply firm, steady pressure to both nostrils by squeezing them between your thumb and index finger for 5 minutes. If bleeding continues or is very heavy, call the pediatrician or seek emergency care.

Teeth

Baby Teeth If knocked out or broken, apply clean gauze to control bleeding and call the pediatric or family dentist.

Permanent Teet If knocked out, handle the tooth by the top and not the root (the part that would be in the gum). If dirty, rinse gently without scrubbing or touch-ing the root. Do not use any cleansers. Use cold running water or milk. Place the tooth in clean water or milk and transport the tooth with the child when seeking emergency care. Call and go directly to the pediatric or family dentist or an emergency department. If the tooth is broken, save the pieces in milk and call the pediatric or family dentist right away. Stop bleeding using gauze or a cotton ball in the tooth socket and have the child bite down.

Convulsions, Seizures

If the child is breathing, lay her on her side to prevent choking. Call 911 or your local emergency number for a prolonged seizure (more than 5 minutes).

Make sure the child is safe from objects that could injure her. Be sure to protect her head. Do not put anything in the child's mouth. Loosen any tight clothing. Start rescue breathing if the child is blue or not breathing. (Please see other side.)

Head Injuries

DO NOT MOVE A CHILD WHO MAY HAVE A SERIOUS HEAD, NECK, OR BACK INJURY. This may cause further harm.

Call 911 or your local emergency number right away if the child

  • Loses consciousness

  • Has a seizure (convulsion)

  • Experiences clumsiness or inability to move any body part

  • Has oozing of blood or watery fluid from ears or nose

  • Has abnormal speech or behavior

Call the pediatrician for a child with a head injury and any of the following:

  • Drowsiness

  • Difficulty being awakened

  • Persistent headache or vomiting

For any questions about less serious injuries, call the pediatrician.

Poisons

If the child has been exposed to or ingested a poison, call Poison Help at 1-800-222-1222. A poison expert is available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.

Swallowed Poisons Any nonfood substance is a potential poison. Do not give anything by mouth or induce vomiting. Call Poison Help right away. Do not delay calling, but try to have the substance label or name available when you call.

Fumes, Gases, or Smoke Get the child into fresh air and call 911, the fire department, or your local emergency number. If the child is not breathing, start CPR and continue until help arrives. (Please see other side.)

Skin Exposure If acids, lye, pesticides, chemicals, poisonous plants, or any potentially poisonous substance comes in contact with a child's skin, eyes, or hair, brush off any residual material while wearing rubber gloves, if possible. Remove contaminated clothing. Wash skin, eyes, or hair with a large amount of water or mild soap and water. Do not scrub. Call Poison Help for further advice.

If a child is unconscious, becoming drowsy, having convulsions, or having trouble breathing, call 911 or your local emergency number. Bring the poisonous substance (safely contained) with you to the hospital.

Fainting

Check the child's airway and breathing. If necessary, call 911 and begin rescue breathing and CPR. (Please see other side.)

If vomiting has occurred, turn the child onto one side to prevent choking. Elevate the feet above the level of the heart (about 12 inches).

Choking/CPR

Learn and Practice CPR (Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation).

If Alone with a Child who is Choking...

  • Shout for Help.

  • Start Rescue Efforts.

  • Call 911 or your Local Emergency Number.

Start First aid for Choking IF

  • The child cannot breathe at all (the chest is not moving up and down).

  • The child cannot cough or talk, or looks blue.

  • The child is found unconscious/unresponsive. (Go to CPR.)

Do not Start First aid for Choking IF

  • The child can breathe, cry, or talk.

  • The child can cough, sputter, or move air at all. The child's normal reflexes are working to clear the airway.

If at any time an object is coughed up or the infant/child starts to breathe, stop rescue breaths and call 911 or your local emergency number.

Ask your pediatrician for information on choking/CPR instructions for children older than 8 years and for information on an approved first aid or CPR course in your community.

Last Reviewed:1/24/2019 2:20:52 AM
Last Revised:1/1/2019 2:21:00 AM
Copyright © 2011

When Your Child Needs Emergency Medical Services

It is rare for children to become seriously ill with no warning. Depending on your child’s symptoms, you should usually contact your child’s doctor for advice. Early recognition and treatment of symptoms can prevent an illness or injury from getting worse or turning into an emergency.
Last Reviewed:1/24/2019 2:21:05 AM
Last Revised:12/13/2018 2:21:02 AM

Is Your Child Sick?TM

New @ Delaware Peds

  • NORTH WILMINGTON NEW LOCATION

    We wanted to make everyone aware that we are moving our office location to 1403 Foulk Road, Suite 103. We will be in the new location January 14th. The building is in the same complex it is just closer to the entrance (3 buildings closer). There will be signs help you find the new office. This was at the discretion of the landlord. We apologize for the inconvience.
     
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  • Getting Kids to Eat More Fruits and Veggies

    Here is some sound advice about how to get kids to eat more fruits and vegetables.
     

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